What I’m Into March 2014

Grab button for What I'm Into

Once again, I’m linking up with Leigh Kramer to share some stuff I’ve been into this month. 

Books:

  • Kiera Cass’ “The Selection” and “The Elite”: I started reading these at Leigh’s recommendation and could not put them down. I do love a good YA dystopian novel (although the love triangle in this one isn’t even a little bit compelling). I’m looking forward to the final novel in the series, which comes out in May.
  • Jo Baker’s “Longbourn”: This sounded like it would be so much better than it actually was. I found the novel unnecessarily salacious and the characters not particularly compelling.
  • When Spiritual but not Religious is not Enough by Lillian Daniel: I bought this book based on the strength of the title essay, which I read online and loved.  Daniel is a talented writer and gives a good sermon, I’m sure, but I found that none of the other essays measured up to the first one. I do find myself going back to her point that religion is spirituality with the addition of community and tradition.

Movies:

  • The Monuments Men: Apparently, I am unable to recognize Cate Blanchett without the Galadriel ears. I went to see this movie with a friend and enjoyed it well enough. It helps that WWII isn’t my time period, so I don’t get as nitpicky.
  • Dan in Real Life: This was a Netflix watch, and I am so over romantic comedies where the principals know each other for all of a weekend and think they’re madly in love.  I think I’m far too much of a romantic skeptic to properly enjoy rom coms.
  • Veronica Mars: I went to see this in theatres on opening night, and I’ve never seen the place so packed. I’d just finished the TV series and, as much as I feel terrible for Piz, it was nice to get something resembling closure for the characters (or at least a return to the status quo). And I have to admit, Jason Dohring has aged really well. I’m less agains the whole Logan-Veronica thing now. Although, is it just me or does the spinoff web series with Dick Casablancas as the main character sound like an awful idea?

Television:

  • Call the Midwife Season 3: I’m pretty sure I averaged about 7 ugly cries per episode. It was stunning, as usual, although I’m still bummed that even the poorest characters have nicer teeth than I do.
  • I also wrapped up both my Veronica Mars and Gilmore Girls watch-throughs this month, which left me at loose ends. I tried Suits and Friday Night Lights, but couldn’t get into either (I will never understand why Americans love football so much. It bores me to tears.) I eventually settled on Parenthood and Joan of Arcadia, both of which I’m loving.
  • I’m also keeping up on the usuals: How I Met Your Mother, Modern Family, Community, Big Bang Theory, Parks & Rec, and Once Upon a Time (which is shaping up to be another season of “surprise, they’re related” and “surprise, they’re not dead” twists)

Music:

I got a copy of Rend Collective’s new CD this month and have been loving it. Boldly I Approach is definitely my favourite track off of the CD.

I also got a physical copy of the Glaubenszentrum Gott und König CD and have been playing it in the car incessantly. My excuse is that I’m using it to teach Aaron German for our trip to Europe this summer.

Food:

I’ve been chocolate-free for Lent this year, which means I’ve compensated by going on a huge citrus kick. These blood orange and lemon curd cookies were my favourite experiment.

Meal-wise, I cannot rave enough about these roasted garlic mashed potatoes, this Zuppa Toscana (a soup with potato, kale, and sausage), this pulled pork mac and cheese, and these orange pancakes with orange berry sauce.

As usual, you can find my monthly What I’m Into Pinterest board here.

On the eating out front, I had a chance to stop by Schwartz’ deli during my brief trip to Montreal this month, and I can confirm that those smoked meat sandwiches live up to the hype. So good!

Online:

  • Matthew Paul Turner’s post on social media Christianity (following the whole red x to end himan trafficking trend) was phenomenal.
  • Ben Moberg’s posts (here and here) on the whole World Vision imbroglio split my heart wide open. I long for my fellow evangelicals to realize that it’s not our job to play triage for God, and that there is always more room at God’s table.

IRL:

Pi Day (March 14th) is quite possibly my favourite unofficial holiday. For the past few years, I haven’t let it pass without observing it in some way. This year it fell on a Friday, so I made a bunch of pies and had friends over for board games. Appearance-wise, I was particularly proud of this peach one.

Image

Image

Clockwise from bottom left: Maple Nutmeg Custard Pie, Peach Pie, Coconut Cream Pie in a Meringue Shell, Peanut Butter and Jelly pie, and, my personal favourite, Raspberry Lime Italian Meringue Pie (recipe).

I also turned 23 this month and, as unspectacular-sounding a birthday as that is, took the opportunity to make a trifle. Birthday trifles are becoming a tradition in the Moss household ever since I made this Turtle Trifle for my husband’s birthday last summer (easily my most pinned/viewed post ever). This time, I went with this peaches and cream trifle and it looked just as lovely.

Image

On the non-food front, I went on a brief trip to Montreal for a conference this month, which I really enjoyed, and, while in the city, I also had the chance to meet up with an old friend for supper, which was absolutely lovely.

I also did my first stint in the nursery at church, and can now confirm what parents have known all along—that toddlers are little getaway artists. You wouldn’t think they could move that fast, but you’d be wrong.

 

Anyway, that’s been my March (well, that and endless snow and cold). Be sure to head on over to Leigh’s blog for more posts.

What I’m Into February 2014

Image

How is February over already? And how are we already halfway through winter term? I need to try not to think about this too much. But, as usual, I’m wrapping up the month by linking up with Leigh Kramer to share some of what I’ve been into this month.

Books

  • The Minor Adjustment Beauty Salon by Alexander McCall Smith. This was the latest instalment in the Number 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency books, and as charming as ever. I’m still bummed that BBC cancelled the tv show adaptation after 1 season.

  • Cress by Marissa Meyer. This is book three in a series called The Lunar Chronicles, which is a series of sci-fi adaptations of fairy tales. I’m not much for sci-fi, but I do love fairy tales, and Aaron’s the other way around, so this is a series we can both enjoy together. The premise sounds a bit lame, I know, but I’ve really been enjoying them.

  • Champion by Marie Lu. This is book three in Marie Lu’s Legend series, which I started in the summer and loved. I won’t give away the ending or anything, but I am glad I finally got my hands on book 3.

TV

  • Binge-watching: Veronica Mars (just finished, so pumped for the movie!) and Gilmore Girls (we’re on season 7, and starting to get bummed about the fact that none of the characters except for Logan and Mrs. Kim have shown any growth since season 1. Also, I would totally be up for a spinoff show about Lane and Zach).
  • Keeping up on: Parks and Rec, How I Met Your Mother, Big Bang Theory (go Amy Farrah Fowler!), Community, Modern Family, and Call the Midwife (Chummy’s back :D).

Movies

  • Slumdog Millionnaire: watched this one for the first time on the plane home from Germany at the beginning of the month. I’m a sucker for the trivia show as a plotline, although this is much darker than E.L. Konigsburg’s The View From Saturday.
  • A Goofy Movie: one of my favourites. We went over to friends’ for an afternoon of Disney movies, and this was my pick because Powerline.
  • The Great Mouse Detectives: Our friends’ pick for the Disney movie afternoon. I hadn’t actually seen it before, but it was pretty adorable.

Food

So many favourite new recipes this month! I loved these chocolate and pistachio sliced cookies, and this hachis parmentier (French shepherd’s pie, way better than the original) was to die for. And this Moroccan-spiced chicken with pistachio lemon couscous was absolutely amazing (and dairy-free,Leigh) and my husband was a huge fan of this pasta al pomodoro recipe. You can find these and all my other favourites over on my What I’m Into Pinterest board for the month.

Music

Just one musical obsession for the month: while in Germany, I heard a few songs from a group called Glaubenszentrum (think German Hillsong). Anyway, I loved their stuff, and I’ve been listening to their Gott und König (God and King) CD pretty obsessively since I got back. It’s also had the side effect of improving my grasp on German grammar.

IRL

  • As I’ve alluded to, I made a brief trip to Germany at the end of January/Beginning of February to attend my grandfather’s funeral and see the rest of my family. I was glad I could be there, but it went too fast. I’m happy to say that my family and I have plans to go again in the summer, so I’ll be able to spend more time with everyone, and maybe even take a few days to see some favourite historical sites.
  • I got to preach again this month. I was pretty much all over the place with my preparation, and had to cut out about three ideas that were too complicated to pull off in the time I had, but it went well. I’m so grateful to belong to a church that allows me the opportunity to preach (and grateful that I don’t have to do it every week, because it’s a lot of work. Props to the pastors who do).
  • And, on the cross-stitch front, I’ve been obsessed with the Pixel People patterns from the Wee Little Stiches shop on Etsy. Here’s what I’ve finished so far, please excuse the terrible photography, and please forgive me if you start quoting The Princess Bride and can’t stop. That happened to me too while I was making it.:

Image

Anna is my own design, I got tired of waiting for the pattern to be updated (it has been now, and you get both Anna and Elsa in their iconic outfits)

Image

Image

 

That’s it for me for February, be sure to head over to Leigh’s and check out everyone else’s submissions.

What I’m Into January 2014

Image

I’m a bit late on this monthly recap, as I unexpectedly spent the end of January wifi-less in Germany (first transatlantic travel in 12 years!), but as usual I’m linking up with Leigh Kramer to share some of the things I’ve been into this January.

Books:

  • The Thursday Next series by Jasper Fforde, books 1-7. I really enjoyed these, especially 1-4. They’re quirky and there are a lot of fun references for literature geeks.
  • The Graceling trilogy by Kristin Cashore. I mostly enjoyed this series, although as a fan of committed monogamy I found some of the main characters’ sexual mores a bit cringeworthy. Also, am I the only one who completely doesn’t buy the claim that Katsa and Po are supposed to love each other so much, but they really don’t want to get married? Not just don’t feel it’s necessary, but reject it completely?
  • Bossypants by Tina Fey. This was my plane ride read when I realized I could not bring myself to be productive and read Heiko Oberman’s The Dawn of the Reformation. I regret nothing, and I only hope my chuckling to myself didn’t annoy my seatmates too much. If you like Tina Fey’s work as a screenwriter, you’ll like this book.

Movies:

  • The Secret Life of Walter Mitty–not amazing, but pretty not bad, as my husband would say. And some gorgeous landscapes.
  • Despicable Me–I hadn’t seen this before and, while I think it may have been a bit overhyped, I did enjoy it.
  • Aladdin–A rewatch, since I recently acquired it (I finally have a complete collection of Disney princess movies!). I get the genie’s numbers stuck in my head way too often, but it’s all good
  • Legally Blonde: The Musical–Not strictly a movie, I went to see a local production of the play. Somewhat unfortunately, the two catchiest numbers are “Ohmigod You Guys!” and “Gay or European,” neither of which I particularly wanted to be caught singing under my breath, but I did enjoy myself. Aaron opted out of this particular show, and I went with some girlfriends instead.
  • Austenland–This was a plane watch on the Toronto-Pearson flight. It wasn’t a bad way to spend two hours (although I’m glad I opted out of shelling out to see it in theatres), but I don’t totally buy the love story.

TV:

  • I’ve been keeping up with the usual shows: Community, How I Met Your Mother, Big Bang Theory, Parks & Rec, and Modern Family.
  • We also watched through season three of Sherlock in one sitting, which in hindsight may have been a bad idea, since we’re now left waiting another year for more..
  • Aaron and I have also been continuing with our Gilmore Girls watch-through and are just done season 5. I’m loving that Lorelai and Luke are a thing, but realizing how much I don’t like Rory (and don’t understand why everyone in Stars Hollow loves her so much. She’s self-absorbed, not particularly considerate, and honestly fairly unremarkable).
  • And, like Leigh, I finished season 1 of Veronica Mars this month. However, unlike Leigh, I’m thinking Team Duncan. Logan rubs me the wrong way–he’s kind of entitled.
  • Board Games:

    • I’ve been really into Ticket to Ride and Carcassone this month. I also played Dominion for the first time and managed to eke out a win despite having no idea what was happening.

    Food:

    Online:

    • I enjoyed Malcolm Gladwell’s thoughts over at Relevant on how he rediscovered faith.
    • I got chills reading Joy Bennett’s description of her ordination, particularly the Luther Lee quote she included.
    • And finally, Greg Boyd’s interview on Open Theism (or, as he prefers to call it, the open view of the future) over at RHE’s blog is well-worth a read. I have a tremendous amount of respect for Dr. Boyd. (Also, he answered my question!)

    IRL:

    I finished up the Eshet Chayil cross-stitch I was working on, as well as an ironic “Home is” one that I quite enjoy. Currently, I’m almost done the Disney Princesses pixel people cross stitch from wee little stiches, and toying with the idea of designing Anna myself to round it out.

    Image

    Image

    I’m also having a ton of fun with my TA work. I was assigned to a course on Early Modern women, which is my all-time favourite subject matter, so I’ve really been enjoying myself. To give you an idea of how much I geek out over this, I already owned the textbook because I had asked for it for my birthday two years ago.

    Finally, on a less happy note, my grandfather passed away at the end of the month. It wasn’t unexpected, as he’d been quite ill for some time. I hadn’t seen him in 12 years, since he lives in Germany and my family hasn’t really had the money for transatlantic airfare for 6 in awhile, but my husband and I were able to come up with the money for me to head over to Essen for a long weekend and join my mother and her side of the family at the funeral. I’m so grateful I was able to go and to spend time with my grandmother and the rest of my German family. International travel tends to make me nervous, mostly because I tend to worry excessively at border crossings (I agonized for 10 minutes about whether to declare a Toblerone bar on the grounds that it was “sort of a milk product), but the border crossings went off without a hitch, and none of my planes crashed, and I’m not even terribly jet-lagged, so I’m going to call my first transatlantic flight in twelve years a success, even if the bathrooms on planes have gotten a lot smaller since I was 9.

    That’s it for me for January, be sure to head over to Leigh’s blog to check out some of the other contributions.

    What I’m Into December 2013

    What I'm Into

    How is 2013 practically over already? And, for that matter, how is Christmas break almost over? December’s been a great month, once I got through the first week of end-of-term crunch. It’s been great to take a break from schoolwork and visit with friends and family, read fiction, watch TV, and do absolutely nothing intellectually challenging for a few weeks. As I do every month, I’m compiling a recap of things I’ve been into in December and linking up with the lovely Leigh Kramer.

    Books:

    • The Internment Chronicles Book 1 by Lauren Destefano. I enjoy her books, but I found the premise for this series (an island in the sky, which cut off all contact with the ground), a bit implausible.
    • Uglies, Pretties, and Specials by Scott Westerfeld. I couldn’t put this series down. However, I’d be happy to never hear the words bubbly, bogus, and icy again.
    • Son by Lois Lowry. Like every other North American public school graduate, I had to read the Giver for school (twice, actually). I read Gathering Blue and Messenger a few years back, and found out in last month’s link-up that there was a fourth book in the series. I enjoyed the way this book tied together so many different societies from Lowry’s dystopian world, and the chance to get a birthmother’s perspective. I’d found them intriguing when I read The Giver.
    • Enclave, Outpost, and Horde by Ann Aguirre. Again, I could not put these down. I’m a sucker for a good dystopian YA novel.
    • The Big Over Easy and The Fourth Bear by Jasper Fforde. These books were so much fun. I’m looking forward to reading his Thursday Next series. If you like mysteries that are clever and funny, I definitely recommend Fforde.
    • The House at Riverton by Kate Morton. This was a sad read, but I couldn’t put it down. I had to find out what actually happened to the R.S. Hunter.

    Movies:

    • Frozen. This was so adorable! The songs weren’t on par with Tangled. but I loved the characters and the exploration of sisterhood. This was the first Disney movie in years that managed to come up with a plot twist I didn’t expect, and I just about cheered when the male lead asked the female lead’s permission before kissing her.
    • The Hobbit 2: The Desolation of Smaug. This was very part-two-ish. I’m looking forward to seeing how There and Back Again ties things up. It’s been so long since I read The Hobbit (10 years, give or take) that I forgot most of the plot.
    • Sleepless in Seattle. Just watched this for the first time with my husband and my in-laws. It’s worse than the typical romantic comedy tripe as far as the actual love story goes, but amusing. And goodness gracious, those computers…so dated.

    Food:

    Music:

    • Jennifer Knapp’s greatest hits definitely takes the prize for most listened to this month. I bought it after falling in love with Martyrs and Thieves on Youtube and, while it’s still my favourite track on the album, it’s got some pretty stiff competition.
    • Speaking of Youtube, Aaron and I have been enjoying Anthem Lights’ acoustic covers and medleys of pop songs, and we downloaded their cover albums on iTunes for road trip music. I defy you not to get this Taylor Swift mashup stuck in your head.
    • I also stumbled on a pre-Christmas music sale at the bookstore I used to work at, and stocked up on Christmas music for next year. Favourites include Hillsong’s We Have A Saviour, Amy Grant’s A Christmas Album, and Josh Wilson’s Noel
    • And, of course, I got some new CDs for Christmas/with Christmas money that I’m super excited to listen to: Gungor’s I Am Mountain, New Life Worship’s Strong God, Laura Story’s God of Every Story, and more.

    TV:

    • Aaron and I are still going strong with our Gilmore Girls watch-through. We’re into season 4 now, and I spent most of season 2 and 3 railing at Jess for being terrible and railing at Rory for being a jerk to Dean. I also want to slap Emily for acting like such a spoiled brat toward Lorelai sometimes, and Sookie is still who I want to be when I grow up.
    • And oh. my. goodness., the mid-season finale of Once Upon a Time. I was so proud of Rumple and Regina for doing the right thing, at great cost to themselves.
    • I also watched a few episodes of Extreme Cheapskates, only to be completely repulsed. It’s a whole different way to  have an unhealthy relationship with money. I do, however, enjoy laughing at the people who say dumb things like “I estimate that I save about 30 dollars a year by not buying toilet paper.”

    Online:

    • This list of cookie cutters on Buzzfeed is pretty awesome.
    • This guest post over at Christena Cleveland’s blog on the church and people with mental illness had some great food for thought.
    • There’s less in this section than usual, mostly because a) everyone taking a blogging break for the holidays and b) the Internet was kind of dominated by posts that began with the words “I know the last thing anyone needs is another post about Duck Dynasty, but…”

    IRL:

    • I got super lucky at the beginning of this month and won the Merry Christmas to you giveaway hosted by Be Mama Be, The Cardigan Way, Little Did She Know, State of Hospitality, Barefoot on 45th, and Beauty School Dropout. I won so many lovely goodies, and everyone was really great about finding alternatives that would ship to Canada where necessary. Thanks so much to all 6 of you :)
    • We hosted a board games and Christmas cookies party in our apartment just before we left for home. It was the most people we’d crammed into our apartment, and it was a lot of fun. Even if I did discover that I am not, in fact, unbeatable at Balderdash.
    • Of course, the highlight of every December is the extended trip home to see friends and family. Despite being snowed in by no less than three major snowstorms (I am never singing songs about white Christmases again), we’ve managed to see just about everyone. I even managed to get in to my old high school and speak to a former teacher’s history class about going on to grad school in history, which was a lot of fun. We also arrived just in time to help my parents with their move into a new house, and I have confirmed that I never want to move in winter, and especially at Christmastime. It’s a lot of added stress for my parents, but they’re troopers and are making great progress.
    • Vacation has also provided me with the opportunity to take up cross-stitching again. I had modified an alphabet sampler design to make an eshet chayil cross stitch chart back in the summer, and after about 15 straight Gilmore Girls episodes of working on it, I’m about 60 French knots away from finishing it. I love it, and I’m super excited to post pictures of the finished product on my Twitter feed and on next month’s What I’m Into.

    That’s about it for December for me. I’m looking forward to my in-laws’ New Years’ Eve get-together tomorrow, and I’m planning on squeezing every last bit of relaxation I can out of Christmas break. Happy New Year, and be sure to check out the other posts over at Leigh’s blog.

    What I’m Into November 2013

    Image

    How is it end of term already? Time to procrastinate even more than usual, which means it’s the perfect time to put together a What I’m Into post for November. As usual, I am linking up with the lovely Leigh Kramer.

    Books

    I read 4 books not for school this month (plus a few for school, like Carlo Ginzburg’s The Cheese and the Worms and Emmanuel Leroy Ladurie’s Montaillou, that had been on my to-read list for ages).

    • Jesus Feminist by Sarah Bessey—I’d been looking forward to this book for months (it’s one of the few titles I’ve actually bothered to preorder) and it was lovely. If you follow her blog at all, it was very her. Not confrontational, but invitational.
    • When We Were on Fire by Addie Zierman—So good! I lost a ton of sleep because I had to finish it all in one sitting, but it was totally worth it. I understand that it’s been named one of Publishers Weekly’s top 5 religion books of the year.
    • Allegiant—My turn finally came to borrow the library’s copy of this, and I have so many feelings about it! I still can’t believe that Veronica Roth ended the series the way she did, and I’m kind of conflicted about her decision, but the trilogy is well worth a read. And the movie trailer looks promising as well.
    • Love is an Orientation—This one’s been on my to-read list for ages, and Benjamin Moberg’s recommendation over on Addie Zierman’s blog bumped it up to the top. I really appreciated it, and the central point that, at the end of the day, individuals stand on their own two feet before God and we don’t get to micromanage their faith journey is a necessary reminder.

    Food:

    As usual, I’ve created a Pinterest Board with some favourite recipes for this month. I particularly liked the salted chocolate shortbread and the cider Dijon pork chops. I also loved Argo Tea’s pumpkin chai rooibos latte, but I still haven’t perfected recreating it at home. It’s a work in progress.

    I’ve also started to gear up for Christmas baking (one of my favourite things to do) and I love the fact that my church and my program are small enough that I can bake for everyone. I’ve baked and frozen some cookies and the dough for others already, and I’ve got at least one more good baking day to go. I’m particularly looking forward to trying these dark chocolate pistachio shortbread cookies.

    TV Shows

    Clearly, I watch far too much television. I’ve continued to keep up with new episodes of Downton Abbey (it’s nice to see Robert and Cora back to normal, even if nothing else is), Once Upon A Time (it finally occurred to me after the last episode that I don’t like Henry much. I think it’s because he’s not really all that bright. Does that make me a terrible person?), Big Bang Theory, Drop Dead Diva, How I Met Your Mother (the rhyming episode was kind of adorable, actually), Parks & Recreation, and Modern Family.

    Aaron and I have also started watching through Gilmore Girls at the recommendation of a friend from church. I was skeptical because I’ve never been particularly fond of Alexis Bledel as an actress (she manages to seem completely emotionless no matter what’s happening) but on Gilmore Girls it totally works, since Rory balances out Lorelai. We’ve also started watching through the British comedy Miranda, starring Chummy from Call the mIdwife. It’s a bit over-the-top at times, but good for a laugh (or should I say “what I call a laugh”).

    Movies

    I saw two movies this month, both in theatres. Ender’s Game and The Hunger Games: Catching Fire were both excellent and definitely did justice to the books they were based on. I’ve also discovered that I cannot even look at Mags or Rue’s face without starting to cry. Rue especially—she reminds me so much of my own little sister at the same age.

    Music

    On the 17th, Aaron and I drove down to see Rend Collective and Audrey Assad in Rochester. The place was packed—apparently there’s nothing quite like the words free concert to draw in every youth group from a 100-mile radius—and both Audrey and Rend Collective were stellar (not that anyone’s surprised, really). The Campfire album has been playing more or less nonstop in our car since then. They also played a song from their upcoming album (which, coincidentally, releases just in time for my birthday. I’m dropping copious hints) called My Lighthouse, which I just love.

    I’ve also had a recent obsession with an older song of Jennifer Knapp’s: Martyrs and Thieves. I’ve played it so often that I’m sure Aaron’s thoroughly tired of it by now.

    And of course, the holiday season is upon us, which means it’s time to pull out all the Christmas favourites, both the nostalgic ones (there may or may not be a lot of Michael W. Smith and Amy Grant coming from my speakers in the next month) and some favourites, like Jenny and Tyler’s Love Came Down: A Christmas EP or High Street Hymns’ Love Shall Be Our Token. I’m also busting out GLAD’s In the First Light, because it’s not Christmas at my parents’ house unless my dad breaks out his guitar and leads us in singing that song. It’s still one of my favourites.

    Online

    There was so much goodness on the Internet this month, I couldn’t possibly list all my favourites for you, but here are a few pieces I loved.

    • Luke Harms (a US veteran) had a great piece on Memorial Day over at A Deeper Story
    • Micah J. Murray’s satirical contribution to Sarah Bessey’s Jesus Feminist synchroblog on How Feminism Hurts Men became so popular it crashed his site. I feel like being all hipster about it and pointing out that I read it before it took off. (Side note, I also made a contribution of my own to the synchroblog, on how I am a Jesus Feminist because of my dad).
    • How cool is this cake pan shaped like an open book or this set of snow globe salt and pepper shakers?
    • And finally, if you’re looking for some gift ideas, especially for children, I recommend checking out this list of onesies, this list of toys that encourage learning, and this list of gifts for girls compiled by the American Association of University Women. And yes, I am totally becoming that aunt who only gives books or educational toys. I may as well own it.

    IRL

    At the very beginning of November, I was fortunate enough to visit Chicago for a workshop on Early Modernity in Global Perspective at the Newberry Library in Chicago. It was great to be able to meet so many other premodernists at once. We went out for drinks, and the first topic of conversation was Judith Bennett’s book on female brewers in the Middle Ages. It was wonderful. I did learn, though, that if a restaurant is in the Waldorf Astoria, I should assume it’s expensive no matter what my little tourist handout says. I also learned that I should always have a number for a cab company, even if I’m sure I won’t need it. If one gets off the bus at the wrong stop and has no idea where one’s hotel is, it could save one walking half a mile on the highway in the dark and the pouring rain. Hypothetically.

    We also had to privilege to see some friends from church get married on the 16th. It was a lovely ceremony, and I also loved watching how family and church friends pitched in before and during the ceremony to pull it all together. I got to help with sandwiches for the reception, and it was so much fun. Even if I never want to open another tuna can ever again :P

    Last Thursday, we got together with friends from school to celebrate American Thanksgiving and Hanukkah. As it turns out, turkey, pumpkin cookies (like these pumpkin snickerdoodles), latkes, and chocolate coins are a really good combination.

    And finally, I’ve been enjoying doing all my Christmas gift shopping and making. We decided after talking it over with our families that we’d make some donations to charity and give each other only small, homemade gifts where possible, and it’s made Christmas gift preparation so much more fun for me. I may even have busted out colour-coded charts to figure out what to make for whom.

    Anyway, that’s it for November. December is shaping up to be a month of paper writing (ugh), holiday celebration (yay!), and spending some time back home in New Brunswick (double yay!). Be sure to check out some of the other What I’m Into submissions over at Leigh’s blog!

    That’s Church–Cross Stitch Chart

    So, a week and a half ago on Twitter (as recently catalogued on Rachel Held Evans’ Sunday Superlatives), this happened:

    Image

    And since I love all things cross-stitch, I naturally volunteered.

    Image

    It’s not actually stitched yet, but I have a paper to procrastinate, so I did put together a chart. Depending on what count Aida you use, I figure it should make a largeish bookmark. 

    Image

     

    Yes, I made it in Paint. What can I say, I’m technologically challenged. Also pattern creation software is kind of expensive. I didn’t assign specific DMC colours, since a variety should work ok, The church at the top is a modification of a house pattern from Kooler Design Studio’s 2006 booklet “80+ Cross-Stitch Kind Thoughts,” and the alphabets I used were from their “A Big Collection of Alphabets in Cross Stitch” booklet. I’m not sure of the year.

    Given how my list of cross-stitch projects usually works, this could be done within the week or it could take weeks. I do also have a Dr. Horrible cross stitch and an Eshet Chayil cross stitch to work on. Thank goodness for Christmas break, right?

    Apple Pie in a Whole Wheat Cheddar Crust

    Apple Cheddar Pie

    It’s apple season, which means that I’ve been on the lookout for new recipes to put all this seasonal bounty to good use. I found this recipe in the Company’s Coming Cheese Book, and I’m so pleased with it. Apple and cheese is a surprisingly delicious pairing. The recipe called for Granny Smith apples (which would have been a great fit, since they’re so tart), but I had McIntosh apples on hand so I just cut down the sugar instead.

    You’ll need:

    • 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
    • 3/4 cup whole wheat flour
    • 3/4 teaspoon salt
    • 3/4 cup lard or shortening
    • 1 1/4 cups grated sharp Cheddar cheese
    • 1 egg
    • 2 teaspoons apple cider vinegar
    • 3-4 tablespoons cold water
    • 3/4-1 cup sugar
    • 1/4 cup all-purpose flour
    • 1/4-1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
    • 7 medium apples, cored, peeled, and sliced (tart apples such as Granny Smith preferred, reduce sugar otherwise)
    • 1 cup grated sharp Cheddar cheese

    Combine first amount of all-purpose flour, whole wheat flour, and salt. Cut in lard and first amount of cheese until the mixture is crumbly. Whisk egg, vinegar, and cold water and stir into the flour mixture until the dough clings together. Form two balls, wrap in plastic wrap, and refrigerate 1 hour.  Preheat the oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit. Roll out the bottom crust to 1/8 inch thickness and line a 10 inch pie plate. Toss the apple slices with the flour, sugar, and cinnamon. Arrange the slices in the pie crust, top with second amount of cheese. Top with the second pie crust, cut slits into it, and crimp the edges. Bake 1 hour on the bottom rack of the oven, let cool slightly, and enjoy.

    What I’m Into October 2013

    Another month, another roundup. Once again, I’m linking up with Leigh Kramer.

    Image

    How is October nearly over already? It’s been a busy month. PhD coursework, as it turns out, is a much bigger jump from Masters coursework than Masters was from undergrad work. But business and (slight) lack of sleep notwithstanding, it’s been a good month. I haven’t had time to read too many books for fun or watch any movies, but I’ve still baked and watched TV plenty because occasional outlets for procrastination are necessary.

    Books:

    I only got 3 books read for fun this month. I know, it’s shameful. They were all library books, because it’s much easier to justify taking time off to read when overdue fines are potentially hanging over my head.

    • Deception by C.J. Redwine–this was the sequel to Defiance. It was as good as the previous one, although as it turns out the book does appear to be set in a dystopian version of our world (with a gigantic underground demon/dragon/thing). It’s a bit of an odd conceit.
    • The Fault in our Stars by John Green–I’ve been on the waiting list for this book for months. The premise sounds like something out a Lurlene McDaniel novel (did anyone else torture themselves with those in high school) but it’s grittier. I can see why it’s been so successful.
    • The Fall of Five by Pittacus Lore–I loved this series, but it’s starting to drag on. I really hope the next book wraps things up.

    Television

    • I’ve been keeping up to date with new episodes of Big Bang Theory (how adorable was Howard’s song for Bernadette on the last week’s episode), Parks and Rec, Modern Family, How I Met Your Mother (which is kind of dragging, by this point), Drop Dead Diva (are they finally about to bring Grayson and Jane together? I sure hope so!), and Downton Abbey (all the feels, but I’m trying not to give spoilers).
    • I’ve also been giving Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. and The Mindy Project a try. SHIELD looks promising, but I’m not sold on the Mindy Project. There really aren’t any terribly likeable characters. Maybe they grow on people?

    In the Kitchen

    I created another What I’m Into Pinterest Board to showcase some of my favourite things I made this month. Since you American readers don’t have Thanksgiving until next month, I especially recommend the Cornbread and Sausage Stuffing and the Pot Pie with a Sweet Potato Crust to use up some turkey leftovers.

    Online

    • I nearly lost it laughing at this bizarre list of Puritan names
    • I loved Suzannah Paul’s thoughts on teaching consent to preschoolers.
    • I teared up at Sarah Bessey’s post on why she likes going to church. Also, less than a week until Jesus Feminist releases!
    • And finally, I recommend this post by Adam McLane on how to be a good neighbour during Halloween.

    IRL

    • We didn’t have a family Thanksgiving dinner to go to this year, so we had some friends over, crammed into the attic, played games (I’m still terrible at mafia), and ate way too much food. It was a good time.
    • Convocation for the Masters degree I finished back in August was this past weekend. I have to say, it felt really weird blowing off homework to go to graduation. My aunts came to watch along with my husband, and we all went out to eat afterwards. The ceremony was as boring as those always are, but it was lovely to spend time with family afterwards. I’m looking forward to the next graduation, though, because PhD regalia is much cooler (or something. Cool might not be the right word).
    • Tomorrow, I fly out to Chicago to attend a seminar on Early Modernity in Global Perspective at the Newberry Library. I’m super pumped (and a little nervous about the border crossing passport rigmarole–it’s been years since I’ve had to do that).

    That’s been October for me. Do head on over to Leigh’s website to check out some of the other link-up contributions.

    What I’m Into September 2013

    Image

    So, September’s coming to an end, and that means it’s time for another What I’m Into Link-Up contributions. Crazy busy month notwithstanding, I seem to have managed to make a lot of time for reading and TV-watching. Priorities, right?

    IRL:

    It’s been a really busy month for me. I started coursework for my PhD, which is requiring a lot of reading and whatnot. I’ve got 100+ books to read before Christmas (don’t worry, they won’t make this link-up). It’s busy, but I do like being paid to study what I love.

    I also made my life a little busier yet by getting myself a Pinterest account, after holding out for years. It’s just an easier way to keep track of the recipes I find online. You can follow me here.

    And finally, I had the privilege of preaching at our church on the 29th, as part of our sermon series on Luke. It was my first time preaching, and I was just blown away by how supportive everyone in church was. I’ve got a good church family in Lamplight church, that’s for sure. You can find the sermon online here. Also, apparently my laugh sounds like a wheezy cough. Who knew?

    Movies:

    • Mulan—because seriously, the soundtrack is sooo good.
    • Baby Mama—found this on Netflix, and it was pretty good. Tina Fey and Amy Poehler are always good for a laugh.
    • Elysium—I saw this in theatres and, while I respected what they were trying to say, the execution was only so-so.
    • The Princess and the Frog—it’s been a bit of a Disney binge month
    • Miss Representation—so good!

    TV:

    • Amazing Race Canada—How much did Tim Sr. rock that final challenge?  Good for him!
    • Clone High—I went through this with Aaron, and I now get 25% more pop culture references. The humour did veer into uncomfortable territory, though.
    • Commander in Chief—starring Geena Davis as President Mac Allen. This was so good! I’m really bummed that it got cancelled after one season.
    • Privileged—another show that got cancelled after a season, but this wasn’t nearly as much of a loss as Commander in Chief. Although I have to say I’m not a fan of ending seasons on a cliffhanger.
    • I’ve also caught the first episodes of a few current shows (Parks and Rec, Modern Family, Big Bang Theory, and How I Met Your Mother).  What is this business of airing two episodes for the season premiere?

    Books:

    • Matched/Crossed/Reached by Ally Condie—Matched was the best of the three, and the others didn’t quite measure up. The Society was interesting, though. Reminiscent of the world in The Giver.
    • The Little Way of Ruthie Leming by Rod Dreher—I feel bad for saying this was only okay when it’s his tribute to his sister who died of cancer, but I didn’t love it. I felt it idolized rural areas a bit much.
    • Beautiful Ruins by Jess Walters—Again, okay, not phenomenal
    • I Am Number Four/The Power of Six/The Rise of Nine—I could not put these down. Although the conceit that it’s a true story and the author is involved bugs me.
    • Carry On Warrior by Glennon Melton—Gosh, Glennon writes beautifully. And I completely empathize with her dislike of the dentist.
    • Illuminations: A Novel of Hildegard von Bingen—You can’t love medieval history and women’s history and not be fascinated by Hildegard von Bingen. The description of her time as an anchorite (so completely walled in) with Jutta of Sponheim was something else.
    • The Passage by Justin Cronin—I guess this is the first part of a trilogy, but I don’t think I’ll read the rest.  They’re really long, and the payoff isn’t great.
    • Birthmarked/Prized/Promised by Caragh O’Brien—Again, I could not put these down. They were recommended to me by one of the commenters on last month’s What I’m Into Post, and I’m glad I took them up on their suggestion.
    • Storm by Evan Angler—Another one of those “false conceit of a true story” books.  Only ok.
    • The Bitter Kingdom by Rae Carson—This was the last book in a trilogy I began last month. I can’t resist fantasy or dystopian YA with a strong female heroine.

    Food:

    Due to my adventures on Pinterest, I’ve been making way more new recipes than usual, so I’ve created a What I’m Into September 2013 Pinterest board to showcase some of my favourites

    My very favourite new recipe of the month was the chai-spiced sugar cookies. I’m noticing a definite preponderance of all things chai-spiced, coarse sea salt, and nutella in my repins.

    I’ve also been experimenting with some fair trade chocolate bars, and I am huge fan of Cocoa Camino’s milk chocolate with coarse sea salt.

    Also, I love love love St. Croix Olive’s vanilla balsamic. Thicken it and drizzle it over fruit, and yumm.

    Online must-reads:

    • This brave post by Grace Biskie about her sex demons
    • This cartoon about why we need feminism
    • This post by Diana Trautwein on lament
    • This handy list of nine questions you should ask before you destroy a city in your movie
    • This excerpt of a First Nations paraphrase of the Bible
    • This interview with Greg Boyd about Faith, Doubt, and the Idol of Certainty

    That’s been most of my life for the last month. Be sure to head on over to the link-up and check out some of the other posts as well!

    Great Pizza Crust (And Some Topping Ideas)

    Image

    Pizza is one of my favourite go-to recipes when I have company, because it’s so versatile. You can keep it simple, dress it up a bit (which can be as easy as adding a sprinkle of Parmigiano Reggiano, some coarse salt, and freshly ground pepper), or even experiment with entirely new flavours (I once had a slice of butter chicken pizza, which was absolutely amazing). The key with pizza is not to let the crust (or the mozzarella, if you’re using it) overwhelm the toppings. My favourite pizza crust recipe for the past two years came. believe it or not, from a book by Teresa Giudice of Real Housewives of New Jersey fame. She may not be great at staying on the good side of the law, but it turns out she makes a really great pizza crust. The following recipe makes 6 10-inch pizzas. I’ve modified it slightly, because I never have instant yeast on hand.  I tend to halve it for the two of us, and it makes a great dinner plus a few days of leftovers for lunch.

    You’ll Need:

    • 1 1/4 teaspoons of active dry yeast.
    • 1 3/4 cups tepid water
    • 1/4 cup olive oil
    • 1 1.2 teaspoons salt
    • ~4 1/2 coups flour

    Soften the yeast in water, then add olive oil, salt, and two cups of flour. Stir in the rest of the flour until the dough is sufficiently stiff, and knead until it’s elastic. Put in a bowl greased with some olive oil, cover it with a towel, and let it rise until it’s doubled. Preheat your oven to 475 degrees. Line a pizza stone or pizza pans with cornmeal, stretch out 1/6 of the dough into a 10-inch circle, cover with your favourite toppings, and bake for 8 minutes.  Let it cool on the pan or on a cookie rack, and you’re good to go.

    If you’re looking for topping ideas, margherita is always a good pick (mozza, tomatoes, and some fresh basil after it comes out of the oven). I also like to cover the crust with some grated mozza, add some sliced nectarines or peaches, sprinkle them with some parmigiano reggiano, salt, and pepper, and add some fresh basil and reduced balsamic when it comes out of the oven). I also tried this roasted garlic, chicken, and herb white pizza yesterday and it was phenomenal.

    Follow

    Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.